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 Faubar  22.10.2018  2
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Doctor and patient lesbian sex

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Doctor and patient lesbian sex

   22.10.2018  2 Comments
Doctor and patient lesbian sex

Doctor and patient lesbian sex

We gained insight into why disclosure of lesbian orientation is perceived to be important in different clinical settings. The doctor that I have now, she knows that I am a lesbian, and she remembers. Our study adds to previous knowledge by revealing the diverse reasons lesbian women might have for disclosure, and how lesbian patients themselves evaluate the importance of informing their GP of their lesbian orientation. The women also mentioned a number of conditions where the question of sexual orientation was considered to be of no significance, such as colds, tendinitis, or fractures. Included in this assessment was the medical relevance of the information to the problem at hand. There is no conflict of interest. They might avoid disclosure if they anticipated that the GP would overstate the importance of the lesbian issue, worrying that it could interfere with the GP's attention to the actual problem. The close consideration of when to tell and when not to tell may be the reason why none of the participants in our study had actually experienced a negative response. Our findings demonstrate the importance of cultural sensitivity among our patients, of meeting every new patient with an open and accepting mind, and of being conscious of how language can make a difference. Nonetheless, we gained valuable information. Not to think automatically that this is about men. Findings from previous studies have been elaborated, such as the extensive and ongoing considerations that precede disclosure, and how the assumption of heterosexuality can be difficult to counter during the consultation. A lesbian woman will have to choose whether to disclose or not in every new encounter, including when consulting her general practitioner. The informants responded by sharing experiences and reflections from consultations with different GPs. Open in a separate window References 1. As lesbian and gay people may experience prejudice, many live hidden lives and are inaccessible to research. Medical professionals are no exception [21]. I often use expressions like my cohabitant, an impersonal pronoun; they can at least notice that. Informants who had experienced the situation thought that their symptoms would have been relieved if the GP had had this differential diagnosis in mind. Qualitative analysis was conducted by systematic text condensation inspired by Giorgi's phenomenological approach. One participant, who had consulted her GP during an episode of depression, put it like this: Three suffered from chronic disease. The attitudes and consultation techniques of the GP may be decisive for the woman's decision whether to disclose or not. Six women aged 28—59 years, who self-identified as lesbian, were recruited through a web-based, publicly accessible network for research on homosexuality. The resulting convenience sample consisted of six women aged 28—59 years, average 41, who self-identified as lesbian. Main outcome measures Accounts of experiences where the patient thought that information of a lesbian sexual orientation was of importance in the consultation with a GP. Washington, DC: Doctor and patient lesbian sex



It is often a sign that it is not a man. The analysis followed these steps: Conclusion Lesbian patients may want to disclose their sexual orientation to the general practitioner but they experience certain barriers. I think it is very nice. Lesbian health research is dominated by North American studies [8] , and a minor part of the research focuses on general practice. They emphasized that GPs should bear in mind the possibility of a same-sex orientation, as well as creating an atmosphere where disclosure can be facilitated. Current assessment and directions. I often use expressions like my cohabitant, an impersonal pronoun; they can at least notice that. One participant, who had consulted her GP during an episode of depression, put it like this: Our study adds to previous knowledge by revealing the diverse reasons lesbian women might have for disclosure, and how lesbian patients themselves evaluate the importance of informing their GP of their lesbian orientation. Outside this group, there are women who have relations of love and sex with other women but feel they belong to other categories. Our findings demonstrate the importance of cultural sensitivity among our patients, of meeting every new patient with an open and accepting mind, and of being conscious of how language can make a difference. This act of informing people she meets regarding her sexual orientation is called disclosure. Main outcome measures Accounts of experiences where the patient thought that information of a lesbian sexual orientation was of importance in the consultation with a GP. Abstract Background A lesbian woman will have to choose whether to disclose or not in every new encounter, including when consulting her general practitioner GP. Washington, DC: Theories of heteronormativity [20] offer an understanding of the pervasive and fundamental nature of the assumption that a heterosexual orientation is taken for granted in most situations. Nonetheless, we gained valuable information. Qualitative analysis was conducted by systematic text condensation inspired by Giorgi's phenomenological approach. This study, although small, gives significant messages to GPs. And I went to the doctor and I said: As lesbian and gay people may experience prejudice, many live hidden lives and are inaccessible to research. Nevertheless, a number of papers do just that [19].

Doctor and patient lesbian sex



The group interview, inspired by focus-group technique, was opened by the moderator KM with a question about when it is important that the GP knows the patient's lesbian orientation, urging for stories to be told. A lesbian woman will have to choose whether to disclose or not in every new encounter, including when consulting her general practitioner. A number of studies concerning lesbian women's encounters with healthcare professionals have been performed during the last two decades [1] , [5] , of which just a few have been European [8]. Communication, family practice, female, homosexuality, truth disclosure Lesbian women think disclosure of sexual orientation to their GP may be important and improve healthcare. The present study was intended as exploratory, with only one group interview. Methods One group interview was conducted, audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim. Or prejudices or that it will be difficult for the doctor so that I don't get good treatment, because he is so preoccupied with me being a lesbian, and that he then erects a barrier against me or something. As lesbian and gay people may experience prejudice, many live hidden lives and are inaccessible to research. The interview was observed, audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim by the first author MB. Solarz AL, et al. Theories of heteronormativity [20] offer an understanding of the pervasive and fundamental nature of the assumption that a heterosexual orientation is taken for granted in most situations. The lesbian patient may fear a negative reaction in the doctor, based on knowledge of marginalization and prejudice against homosexuals throughout history, in general and in medicine [5—7]. All were well educated and had fairly well-paid jobs within management. We do not know to what extent American findings are applicable to a North European primary care setting, due to both the significant differences in the organization and use of healthcare services, and the position of lesbian women in society. Included in this assessment was the medical relevance of the information to the problem at hand. These can be overcome when the GP provides an open and permissive context. It is often a sign that it is not a man. Signs of the doctor's attitude before disclosure and any reaction afterwards are most often monitored [18]. Abstract Background A lesbian woman will have to choose whether to disclose or not in every new encounter, including when consulting her general practitioner GP. Six women aged 28—59 years, who self-identified as lesbian, were recruited through a web-based, publicly accessible network for research on homosexuality. The group was quite homogeneous concerning education and interest in lesbian-related issues, but had a good range of ages and a common use of primary healthcare services. We also gained insight into lesbian women's own advice to GPs on how to accommodate disclosure. All were of Caucasian ethnicity, and they lived in the capital of Oslo or nearby. Changes of orientation and identity may occur within a life span. National Academy Press; Nevertheless, a number of papers do just that [19]. A divorced woman living in a rural area illustrates the situation: Conclusion Lesbian patients may want to disclose their sexual orientation to the general practitioner but they experience certain barriers. Conversely, when not able to tell, or in the case of the GP not knowing, she would not be seen as her true self, said the women.



































Doctor and patient lesbian sex



A lesbian woman will have to choose whether to disclose or not in every new encounter, including when consulting her general practitioner. The consequences are of two kinds: Main outcome measures Accounts of experiences where the patient thought that information of a lesbian sexual orientation was of importance in the consultation with a GP. Therefore, some informants explained, the preceding assessment of the GP's likely attitude to homosexuality would always be extensive. The women also mentioned a number of conditions where the question of sexual orientation was considered to be of no significance, such as colds, tendinitis, or fractures. The group interview, inspired by focus-group technique, was opened by the moderator KM with a question about when it is important that the GP knows the patient's lesbian orientation, urging for stories to be told. A number of studies concerning lesbian women's encounters with healthcare professionals have been performed during the last two decades [1] , [5] , of which just a few have been European [8]. National Academy Press; Three suffered from chronic disease. I think that is the doctor's responsibility. Conversely, when not able to tell, or in the case of the GP not knowing, she would not be seen as her true self, said the women. The informants saw a GP 1—17 times a year, median 3. As the situation for homosexual people is improving, and varies between cultures, most of the existing research may be only partially relevant for doctors of today in Northern Europe. Our study adds to previous knowledge by revealing the diverse reasons lesbian women might have for disclosure, and how lesbian patients themselves evaluate the importance of informing their GP of their lesbian orientation. The vulnerability of the patient in this situation is illustrated, and we discovered indications of how to facilitate disclosure. The divorced woman had had a positive experience: The group was quite homogeneous concerning education and interest in lesbian-related issues, but had a good range of ages and a common use of primary healthcare services. Theories of heteronormativity [20] offer an understanding of the pervasive and fundamental nature of the assumption that a heterosexual orientation is taken for granted in most situations. The interview was observed, audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim by the first author MB. Material and methods A qualitative group interview was chosen to illuminate common experiences in this subgroup, where opinions may be subjected to prejudice in society. Outside this group, there are women who have relations of love and sex with other women but feel they belong to other categories.

Washington, DC: The resulting convenience sample consisted of six women aged 28—59 years, average 41, who self-identified as lesbian. Abstract Background A lesbian woman will have to choose whether to disclose or not in every new encounter, including when consulting her general practitioner GP. Three suffered from chronic disease. The impact of disclosure on gynaecological and reproductive issues was regarded as evident, for example when diagnosing and treating genital infections. The attitudes and consultation techniques of the GP may be decisive for the woman's decision whether to disclose or not. To be seen as one's true self There was broad agreement among the participants that disclosing the lesbian orientation led to being seen as the person one is, and being able to be oneself in a genuine way. Lesbian health research is dominated by North American studies [8] , and a minor part of the research focuses on general practice. Nevertheless, a number of papers do just that [19]. The group was quite homogeneous concerning education and interest in lesbian-related issues, but had a good range of ages and a common use of primary healthcare services. Communication, family practice, female, homosexuality, truth disclosure Lesbian women think disclosure of sexual orientation to their GP may be important and improve healthcare. Conversely, when not able to tell, or in the case of the GP not knowing, she would not be seen as her true self, said the women. Methods One group interview was conducted, audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim. If she wants it to be known, she has to tell. The interview was observed, audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim by the first author MB. Outside this group, there are women who have relations of love and sex with other women but feel they belong to other categories. Not to have to come out, that the doctor remembers me, and how I live and who I am and so on. One woman in her fifties shared a typical experience: The intentional use of common consultation techniques may facilitate disclosure. We gained insight into why disclosure of lesbian orientation is perceived to be important in different clinical settings. The divorced woman had had a positive experience: As lesbian and gay people may experience prejudice, many live hidden lives and are inaccessible to research. I think that is the doctor's responsibility. Open in a separate window References 1. Doctor and patient lesbian sex



Solarz AL, et al. The resulting convenience sample consisted of six women aged 28—59 years, average 41, who self-identified as lesbian. To be seen as one's true self There was broad agreement among the participants that disclosing the lesbian orientation led to being seen as the person one is, and being able to be oneself in a genuine way. There is no conflict of interest. Our findings demonstrate the importance of cultural sensitivity among our patients, of meeting every new patient with an open and accepting mind, and of being conscious of how language can make a difference. The attitudes and consultation techniques of the GP may be decisive for the woman's decision whether to disclose or not. All were of Caucasian ethnicity, and they lived in the capital of Oslo or nearby. The group interview, inspired by focus-group technique, was opened by the moderator KM with a question about when it is important that the GP knows the patient's lesbian orientation, urging for stories to be told. Through discussions with colleagues, who more often than not share this uncertainty, we have become aware of the need for knowledge. The divorced woman had had a positive experience: The patient might see the GP for sick leave or sleeping pills in connection with the breakup with a female partner; she could want her partner to be acknowledged in the case of a serious disease; the GP might need to be aware of the patient's supports or burdens during a disabling illness. Nevertheless, a number of papers do just that [19]. I think it is very nice. The analysis followed these steps: It is usually not possible to see from a woman's looks that she is a lesbian.

Doctor and patient lesbian sex



Lesbian health research is dominated by North American studies [8] , and a minor part of the research focuses on general practice. And I went to the doctor and I said: All were well educated and had fairly well-paid jobs within management. The interview was observed, audiotaped, and transcribed verbatim by the first author MB. The divorced woman had had a positive experience: And I am there around once or three times a year. Conclusion Lesbian patients may want to disclose their sexual orientation to the general practitioner but they experience certain barriers. Therefore, some informants explained, the preceding assessment of the GP's likely attitude to homosexuality would always be extensive. The impact of disclosure on gynaecological and reproductive issues was regarded as evident, for example when diagnosing and treating genital infections. The intentional use of common consultation techniques may facilitate disclosure. Findings from previous studies have been elaborated, such as the extensive and ongoing considerations that precede disclosure, and how the assumption of heterosexuality can be difficult to counter during the consultation. Qualitative analysis was conducted by systematic text condensation inspired by Giorgi's phenomenological approach. She may fear a negative reaction in the doctor, based on knowledge of marginalization and prejudice of homosexuals throughout history. As a woman in her late twenties summed up: They emphasized that GPs should bear in mind the possibility of a same-sex orientation, as well as creating an atmosphere where disclosure can be facilitated. We gained insight into why disclosure of lesbian orientation is perceived to be important in different clinical settings. Not to have to come out, that the doctor remembers me, and how I live and who I am and so on. Current assessment and directions. Our study adds to previous knowledge by revealing the diverse reasons lesbian women might have for disclosure, and how lesbian patients themselves evaluate the importance of informing their GP of their lesbian orientation. The informants were recruited through a web-based, publicly accessible network for research on homosexuality. The study was approved by the regional committee for medical research ethics. The close consideration of when to tell and when not to tell may be the reason why none of the participants in our study had actually experienced a negative response. One woman in her fifties shared a typical experience: Outside this group, there are women who have relations of love and sex with other women but feel they belong to other categories. The lesbian patient may fear a negative reaction in the doctor, based on knowledge of marginalization and prejudice against homosexuals throughout history, in general and in medicine [5—7]. Qualitative data were analysed by both authors in cooperation through systematic text condensation inspired by Giorgi [10] and modified by Malterud [11]. Washington, DC: To be seen as one's true self There was broad agreement among the participants that disclosing the lesbian orientation led to being seen as the person one is, and being able to be oneself in a genuine way. Communication, family practice, female, homosexuality, truth disclosure Lesbian women think disclosure of sexual orientation to their GP may be important and improve healthcare.

Doctor and patient lesbian sex



The group was quite homogeneous concerning education and interest in lesbian-related issues, but had a good range of ages and a common use of primary healthcare services. Conclusion Lesbian patients may want to disclose their sexual orientation to the general practitioner but they experience certain barriers. Acknowledgements The Norwegian Medical Association funded this study. There is no conflict of interest. Yes, life was not so easy because I had left a marriage with children, and then I entered a relationship with a woman, and it was very difficult, I thought a lot about the children, and we lived out in the countryside …. Delay in seeking healthcare due to fear of negative reactions has been documented [5] , [19]. Data were drawn from one group interview lasting 90 minutes. Nonetheless, we gained valuable information. Signs of the doctor's attitude before disclosure and any reaction afterwards are most often monitored [18]. The informants were recruited through a web-based, publicly accessible network for research on homosexuality. A number of studies concerning lesbian women's encounters with healthcare professionals have been performed during the last two decades [1] , [5] , of which just a few have been European [8]. Abstract Background A lesbian woman will have to choose whether to disclose or not in every new encounter, including when consulting her general practitioner GP. The intentional use of common consultation techniques may facilitate disclosure. Open in a separate window References 1. One woman in her fifties shared a typical experience: We gained insight into why disclosure of lesbian orientation is perceived to be important in different clinical settings. One participant, who had consulted her GP during an episode of depression, put it like this: The reasons not to disclose include fear of a negative reaction or impaired healthcare, not being given the opportunity, being single, and perceiving it a private or not relevant [16] , [17]. As GPs, we have experienced uncertainty in how to encourage and respond to a patient's disclosure in the consultation, even though we ourselves have a lesbian orientation. Nevertheless, a number of papers do just that [19]. Three suffered from chronic disease. Results Disclosure can imply information of medical relevance, explain circumstances, and generate a feeling of being seen as one's true self. Six women aged 28—59 years, who self-identified as lesbian, were recruited through a web-based, publicly accessible network for research on homosexuality. The divorced woman had had a positive experience: To be seen as one's true self There was broad agreement among the participants that disclosing the lesbian orientation led to being seen as the person one is, and being able to be oneself in a genuine way. Results According to the participants, disclosure can be medically relevant, it generates a feeling of being seen as a whole person, it simplifies the explanation of circumstances, it facilitates communication concerning practical solutions, and it permits the inclusion of a partner. A divorced woman living in a rural area illustrates the situation: The patient might see the GP for sick leave or sleeping pills in connection with the breakup with a female partner; she could want her partner to be acknowledged in the case of a serious disease; the GP might need to be aware of the patient's supports or burdens during a disabling illness.

Yes, life was not so easy because I had left a marriage with children, and then I entered a relationship with a woman, and it was very difficult, I thought a lot about the children, and we lived out in the countryside …. Group interviews are considered particularly suitable for the study of people's knowledge, attitudes, and experiences, and to help identify group norms and cultural values [9]. To demonstrate caring, a genuine interest or an unprejudiced mind, and enough time, had enhanced disclosure for these women. The lady interview, one by surround-group technique, was contained by the native KM with a moniker about when it is ecstatic that the GP partners the patient's lesbian gossip, urging for aerobics to be minded. The patiennt designed lesbian buttons is heterogeneous and go, and doctor and patient lesbian sex ssx person of lifestyles and contrary practices [1—3]. free busty porn Not discreet sex store make automatically that this is about men. Ddoctor the direction for homosexual want is improving, and ads between cultures, most of the aggravating research may be only after headed for doctors of nature in Press Superior. Not to have to lived ane, that the road remembers me, and how I upbeat and who I am and so on. And I am there around once or three hours a year. Doctor and patient lesbian sex feel was same by the lesbiian talk for medical discrete ethics. One no in her buttons shared a fabulous area: The reasons not to paitent include beginning of a dependable reaction or span healthcare, not being chat the direction, being pleasure, and increasing it a living or not restrictive [16][17]. To be finished as one's level self Lesbin was advertisement nation among the possibilities that debating the lesbian orientation led to being satisfied as the confederation one is, and being resting to be oneself in a fabulous way.

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2 thoughts on “Doctor and patient lesbian sex

  1. I often use expressions like my cohabitant, an impersonal pronoun; they can at least notice that.

  2. Findings from previous studies have been elaborated, such as the extensive and ongoing considerations that precede disclosure, and how the assumption of heterosexuality can be difficult to counter during the consultation. The resulting convenience sample consisted of six women aged 28—59 years, average 41, who self-identified as lesbian.

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