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Blood land sex

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Blood land sex

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Blood land sex

Blood land sex

In Blood, Land, and Sex, Lyda Favali and Roy Pateman examine the roles of the state, ethnic groups, religious groups, and the international community in several key areas of Eritrean law--blood feud or murder, land tenure, gender relations marriage, prostitution, rape , and female genital surgery. Favali and Pateman explore the intersections of the various laws and discuss how change can be brought to communities where legal ambiguity prevails, often to the grave harm of women and other powerless individuals. Chapter 2 offers a brief introduction to nine main ethnies of Eritrea and to more than twenty traditional legal codes. Legal and Political Pluralism in Eritrea is both a welcome addition to the still-sparse literature on Eritrea in English, and a substantial and distinctive contribution to the literature on legal pluralism in Africa. I think the book might prove a bit demanding for the average American undergraduate though it might work in an honors course in, say, African studies or on the anthropology of law. Therefore by legal pluralism they mean "the study of the multiplicity of legal actors concurrent with the state" p. They refer to these socio-political bodies as actors. Legal and Political Pluralism in Eritrea. This significant book focuses on how Eritrea and other newly emerging democracies might build pluralist legal systems that will be acceptable to an ethnically and religiously diverse population. Whatever their specific disciplinary affiliation, and even or especially if they know nothing about Eritrea, I think serious students of legal pluralism in Africa will want to add this book to their libraries. Complicating this task is the use of languages of state law, Amharic, Arabic, Italian, English, and now Tigrinya incomprehensible to many in a society dependent on oral traditions. These are all areas in which traditional law has long played and continues to play a major role in Eritrea. For any other proposed use, contact the Reviews editorial staff at hbooks mail. H-Net permits the redistribution and reprinting of this work for nonprofit, educational purposes, with full and accurate attribution to the author, web location, date of publication, originating list, and H-Net: Rolf Carlson. For every legal issue there is a state rule, a traditional rule, and a sharia rule that may or may not differ because of divergence between state and ethnic or religious groups. The book is well annotated and features a substantial selected bibliography. In Blood, Land, and Sex, Lyda Favali and Roy Pateman In Eritrea, state, traditional, and religious laws equally prevail, but any of these legal systems may be put into play depending upon the individual or individuals involved in a legal dispute. He is author of Eritrea: Currently "the bulk of state law on family and inheritance does not apply to Eritrean muslims; therefore they leave these subject matters to the exclusive competence of the Islamic courts" p. Favali and Pateman explore the intersections of the various laws and discuss how change can be brought to communities where legal ambiguity prevails, often to the grave harm of women and other powerless individuals. Indiana University Press, Printable Version: Blood, Land, and Sex: Blood land sex



The authors themselves claim that their interdisciplinary approach will make the book useful to comparative lawyers, political scientists, anthropologists and ethnographers, sociologists, historians, and students of public policy and women's studies. After a brief introductory chapter, Favali and Pateman introduce these actors and their respective codes in chapters 2, 3, and 4. One thing the book is missing, and which would be helpful at several points for instance the account of Eritrea's various ethnies and codes in chapter 2 or the discussion of the disputes with Yemen or Ethiopia in chapter 7 is a map or maps of contemporary Eritrea. Chapter 5 deals with murder, chapter 6 with land tenure, chapter 7 with land disputes and conflict resolution, chapter 8 with gender and gender relations marriage, women's property rights, etc. Chapter 4 covers the transition to Eritrean independence and the current condition of the Eritrean state and legal system and also briefly considers the contemporary role of transnational and international actors the UN, IMF, etc. Indeed, as they go through their discussion of these areas and as the various different actors enter into or disappear from the discussion and play different roles with respect to these different issues, the narrative as the authors acknowledge almost begins to resemble Pirandello's Six Characters in Search of an Author. Chapter 2 offers a brief introduction to nine main ethnies of Eritrea and to more than twenty traditional legal codes. Complicating this task is the use of languages of state law, Amharic, Arabic, Italian, English, and now Tigrinya incomprehensible to many in a society dependent on oral traditions. H-Net permits the redistribution and reprinting of this work for nonprofit, educational purposes, with full and accurate attribution to the author, web location, date of publication, originating list, and H-Net: The conflict over female genital mutilation provides a striking example of transnational and international actors taking the lead in seeking to overturn traditional practices. Because of conflicting laws, it has been difficult for Eritreans to come to a consensus on what constitutes their legal system. As the authors indicate, there may be a profound contradiction between the current Eritrean government's commitment to women's rights and sexual equality on the one hand and their commitment to religious freedom and, in particular, to the rights of muslim Eritreans. The chapter offers an overview of Eritrea's many rulers or would-be rulers from Abyssinian and Ethiopian kings and Tigrinya warlords to the Italian colonial era, British military administration, and eventual incorporation into Ethiopia. As both the notes and the bibliography make clear, the authors have made use of a wide range of sources in a number of languages and have made particularly extensive use of Italian works on Eritrea. Much of the work on legal pluralism in Africa had been done by anthropologists or by scholars influenced by the anthropology of law. Ethnic or national groups "ethnies" is the term employed by Favali and Pateman , religious groups, the state, and various transnational or international actors all play roles and each of these categories can be broken down into more specific actors, many of whom have introduced their own legal codes. This significant book focuses on how Eritrea and other newly emerging democracies might build pluralist legal systems that will be acceptable to an ethnically and religiously diverse population. Even those of us who own African maps and atlases do not all own sufficiently new ones or show independent Eritrea. He is author of Eritrea: This is certainly a book that students of Eritrea and perhaps those interested in northeastern Africa more generally will want to add to their libraries. In Blood, Land, and Sex, Lyda Favali and Roy Pateman examine the roles of the state, ethnic groups, religious groups, and the international community in several key areas of Eritrean law--blood feud or murder, land tenure, gender relations marriage, prostitution, rape , and female genital surgery. Graduate collections and beyond. Favali and Pateman explore the intersections of the various laws and discuss how change can be brought to communities where legal ambiguity prevails, often to the grave harm of women and other powerless individuals. Legal and Political Pluralism in Eritrea is both a welcome addition to the still-sparse literature on Eritrea in English, and a substantial and distinctive contribution to the literature on legal pluralism in Africa. Currently "the bulk of state law on family and inheritance does not apply to Eritrean muslims; therefore they leave these subject matters to the exclusive competence of the Islamic courts" p. I think the book might prove a bit demanding for the average American undergraduate though it might work in an honors course in, say, African studies or on the anthropology of law. It can, they suggest, "form part of a college course for students of law, anthropology, and sociology" p. Legal and Political Pluralism in Eritrea' Author:

Blood land sex



This significant book focuses on how Eritrea and other newly emerging democracies might build pluralist legal systems that will be acceptable to an ethnically and religiously diverse population. Printable Version: Ethnic or national groups "ethnies" is the term employed by Favali and Pateman , religious groups, the state, and various transnational or international actors all play roles and each of these categories can be broken down into more specific actors, many of whom have introduced their own legal codes. After a brief introductory chapter, Favali and Pateman introduce these actors and their respective codes in chapters 2, 3, and 4. Conclusions are in abeyance because the dictatorship of Isaias Afweki is in legal limbo with a new constitution not in force. For every legal issue there is a state rule, a traditional rule, and a sharia rule that may or may not differ because of divergence between state and ethnic or religious groups. The authors analyze Eritrea's pluralist system in case studies involving the interconnected issues of blood vengeance, feud, money, and settlement of conflicts , property rights, and sex marriage, gender, and women's rights. The state as an actor takes center stage in chapter 3. Indeed, as they go through their discussion of these areas and as the various different actors enter into or disappear from the discussion and play different roles with respect to these different issues, the narrative as the authors acknowledge almost begins to resemble Pirandello's Six Characters in Search of an Author. The discussion of land disputes and conflict resolution in chapter 7 is unusual in that it not only includes the kinds of land disputes and conflicts that we would normally expect to see discussed disputes between individuals, within or between lineages and ethnies or villages, and between the former and the state but also includes discussions of two international land disputes--the dispute with Yemen over the Hanish islands and the border dispute and eventual war with Ethiopia. In Blood, Land, and Sex, Lyda Favali and Roy Pateman In Eritrea, state, traditional, and religious laws equally prevail, but any of these legal systems may be put into play depending upon the individual or individuals involved in a legal dispute. This is certainly a book that students of Eritrea and perhaps those interested in northeastern Africa more generally will want to add to their libraries. As both the notes and the bibliography make clear, the authors have made use of a wide range of sources in a number of languages and have made particularly extensive use of Italian works on Eritrea. Having introduced the actors and their codes, Favali and Pateman turn to a consideration of several areas in which these various actors and codes come into conflict. This significant book focuses on how Eritrea and other newly emerging democracies might build pluralist legal systems that will be acceptable to an ethnically and religiously diverse population. The authors themselves claim that their interdisciplinary approach will make the book useful to comparative lawyers, political scientists, anthropologists and ethnographers, sociologists, historians, and students of public policy and women's studies. One of the benefits of this perspective, they argue, is that it views the state as one actor among others rather than postulating the state as the dominant, even hegemonic actor. The conflict over female genital mutilation provides a striking example of transnational and international actors taking the lead in seeking to overturn traditional practices. As the authors indicate, there may be a profound contradiction between the current Eritrean government's commitment to women's rights and sexual equality on the one hand and their commitment to religious freedom and, in particular, to the rights of muslim Eritreans. The limited resources of the state may mean that for now the suppression of blood feuds is all that can be accomplished and that blood money will continue to be a common response to homicide. This is despite the fact that many attempts have been made by various actors to introduce often substantially different legal orders. Favali a lawyer and student of comparative law and Pateman a political scientist adopt a different perspective in their study of legal and political pluralism in Eritrea. The chapter offers an overview of Eritrea's many rulers or would-be rulers from Abyssinian and Ethiopian kings and Tigrinya warlords to the Italian colonial era, British military administration, and eventual incorporation into Ethiopia. H-Net permits the redistribution and reprinting of this work for nonprofit, educational purposes, with full and accurate attribution to the author, web location, date of publication, originating list, and H-Net: The book is definitely suitable for graduate-level courses.



































Blood land sex



This is certainly a book that students of Eritrea and perhaps those interested in northeastern Africa more generally will want to add to their libraries. The book is well annotated and features a substantial selected bibliography. Favali and Pateman explore the intersections of the various laws and discuss how change can be brought to communities where legal ambiguity prevails, often to the grave harm of women and other powerless individuals. Much of the work on legal pluralism in Africa had been done by anthropologists or by scholars influenced by the anthropology of law. They refer to these socio-political bodies as actors. Chapter 5 deals with murder, chapter 6 with land tenure, chapter 7 with land disputes and conflict resolution, chapter 8 with gender and gender relations marriage, women's property rights, etc. Throughout the book, several categories of "actors" are salient. Having introduced the actors and their codes, Favali and Pateman turn to a consideration of several areas in which these various actors and codes come into conflict. This significant book focuses on how Eritrea and other newly emerging democracies might build pluralist legal systems that will be acceptable to an ethnically and religiously diverse population. Because of conflicting laws, it has been difficult for Eritreans to come to a consensus on what constitutes their legal system. For Favali and Pateman, the key actors are those socio-political bodies which produce law such as ethnic groups, religious groups, the state, and transnational and international organizations, and the key texts are the legal codes loosely defined they have produced and, with varying degrees of success, tried to implement.

He is author of Eritrea: Because of conflicting laws, it has been difficult for Eritreans to come to a consensus on what constitutes their legal system. The conflict over female genital mutilation provides a striking example of transnational and international actors taking the lead in seeking to overturn traditional practices. Throughout the book, several categories of "actors" are salient. Legal and Political Pluralism in Eritrea. Eritrea is not atypical of African states with a population abundant in ethnic, social, linguistic, and religious diversity overlaid with a colonial past, a liberation struggle, a transitional era, and independence. Printable Version: Because of conflicting laws, it has been difficult for Eritreans to come to a consensus on what constitutes their legal system. Blood, Land, and Sex: Even those of us who own African maps and atlases do not all own sufficiently new ones or show independent Eritrea. I think the book might prove a bit demanding for the average American undergraduate though it might work in an honors course in, say, African studies or on the anthropology of law. As the authors recount, many of these rulers, particularly the twentieth-century ones, introduced new codes. The authors analyze Eritrea's pluralist system in case studies involving the interconnected issues of blood vengeance, feud, money, and settlement of conflicts , property rights, and sex marriage, gender, and women's rights. Chapter 2 offers a brief introduction to nine main ethnies of Eritrea and to more than twenty traditional legal codes. Much of the work on legal pluralism in Africa had been done by anthropologists or by scholars influenced by the anthropology of law. Therefore by legal pluralism they mean "the study of the multiplicity of legal actors concurrent with the state" p. In chapter 5, for example, the state has an interest in suppressing the traditional use of blood feuds or blood money in response to murder and replacing it with state punishment. Chapter 5 deals with murder, chapter 6 with land tenure, chapter 7 with land disputes and conflict resolution, chapter 8 with gender and gender relations marriage, women's property rights, etc. Blood land sex



In the more anthropologically oriented work on legal pluralism, the key actors tend to be litigants, plaintiffs, defendants, judges, or juries, and the key texts are often trial transcripts and other court records. Summing Up: H-Africa, H-Net Reviews. Indiana University Press, One of the benefits of this perspective, they argue, is that it views the state as one actor among others rather than postulating the state as the dominant, even hegemonic actor. Eritrea is not atypical of African states with a population abundant in ethnic, social, linguistic, and religious diversity overlaid with a colonial past, a liberation struggle, a transitional era, and independence. The book is definitely suitable for graduate-level courses. In Blood, Land, and Sex, Lyda Favali and Roy Pateman examine the roles of the state, ethnic groups, religious groups, and the international community in several key areas of Eritrean law--blood feud or murder, land tenure, gender relations marriage, prostitution, rape , and female genital surgery. This is certainly a book that students of Eritrea and perhaps those interested in northeastern Africa more generally will want to add to their libraries. Whatever their specific disciplinary affiliation, and even or especially if they know nothing about Eritrea, I think serious students of legal pluralism in Africa will want to add this book to their libraries. After a brief introductory chapter, Favali and Pateman introduce these actors and their respective codes in chapters 2, 3, and 4. Favali and Pateman explore the intersections of the various laws and discuss how change can be brought to communities where legal ambiguity prevails, often to the grave harm of women and other powerless individuals. Favali and Pateman explore the intersections of the various laws and discuss how change can be brought to communities where legal ambiguity prevails, often to the grave harm of women and other powerless individuals. They refer to these socio-political bodies as actors. This significant book focuses on how Eritrea and other newly emerging democracies might build pluralist legal systems that will be acceptable to an ethnically and religiously diverse population. December, Chapter 2 offers a brief introduction to nine main ethnies of Eritrea and to more than twenty traditional legal codes. As the authors indicate, there may be a profound contradiction between the current Eritrean government's commitment to women's rights and sexual equality on the one hand and their commitment to religious freedom and, in particular, to the rights of muslim Eritreans. As both the notes and the bibliography make clear, the authors have made use of a wide range of sources in a number of languages and have made particularly extensive use of Italian works on Eritrea. Ethnic or national groups "ethnies" is the term employed by Favali and Pateman , religious groups, the state, and various transnational or international actors all play roles and each of these categories can be broken down into more specific actors, many of whom have introduced their own legal codes. He is author of Eritrea: In Blood, Land, and Sex, Lyda Favali and Roy Pateman examine the roles of the state, ethnic groups, religious groups, and the international community in several key areas of Eritrean law—blood feud or murder, land tenure, gender relations marriage, prostitution, rape , and female genital surgery. Blood, Land, and Sex: For Favali and Pateman, the key actors are those socio-political bodies which produce law such as ethnic groups, religious groups, the state, and transnational and international organizations, and the key texts are the legal codes loosely defined they have produced and, with varying degrees of success, tried to implement. Throughout the book, several categories of "actors" are salient. As the authors recount, many of these rulers, particularly the twentieth-century ones, introduced new codes. For every legal issue there is a state rule, a traditional rule, and a sharia rule that may or may not differ because of divergence between state and ethnic or religious groups.

Blood land sex



After a brief introductory chapter, Favali and Pateman introduce these actors and their respective codes in chapters 2, 3, and 4. This significant book focuses on how Eritrea and other newly emerging democracies might build pluralist legal systems that will be acceptable to an ethnically and religiously diverse population. Complicating this task is the use of languages of state law, Amharic, Arabic, Italian, English, and now Tigrinya incomprehensible to many in a society dependent on oral traditions. Summing Up: Throughout the book, several categories of "actors" are salient. H-Africa, H-Net Reviews. In Blood, Land, and Sex, Lyda Favali and Roy Pateman In Eritrea, state, traditional, and religious laws equally prevail, but any of these legal systems may be put into play depending upon the individual or individuals involved in a legal dispute. One thing the book is missing, and which would be helpful at several points for instance the account of Eritrea's various ethnies and codes in chapter 2 or the discussion of the disputes with Yemen or Ethiopia in chapter 7 is a map or maps of contemporary Eritrea. Favali and Pateman explore the intersections of the various laws and discuss how change can be brought to communities where legal ambiguity prevails, often to the grave harm of women and other powerless individuals. Having introduced the actors and their codes, Favali and Pateman turn to a consideration of several areas in which these various actors and codes come into conflict. H-Net permits the redistribution and reprinting of this work for nonprofit, educational purposes, with full and accurate attribution to the author, web location, date of publication, originating list, and H-Net: They refer to these socio-political bodies as actors. Whatever their specific disciplinary affiliation, and even or especially if they know nothing about Eritrea, I think serious students of legal pluralism in Africa will want to add this book to their libraries. The book is definitely suitable for graduate-level courses. The chapter offers an overview of Eritrea's many rulers or would-be rulers from Abyssinian and Ethiopian kings and Tigrinya warlords to the Italian colonial era, British military administration, and eventual incorporation into Ethiopia. The conflict over female genital mutilation provides a striking example of transnational and international actors taking the lead in seeking to overturn traditional practices. In Blood, Land, and Sex, Lyda Favali and Roy Pateman examine the roles of the state, ethnic groups, religious groups, and the international community in several key areas of Eritrean law--blood feud or murder, land tenure, gender relations marriage, prostitution, rape , and female genital surgery.

Blood land sex



In Blood, Land, and Sex, Lyda Favali and Roy Pateman examine the roles of the state, ethnic groups, religious groups, and the international community in several key areas of Eritrean law—blood feud or murder, land tenure, gender relations marriage, prostitution, rape , and female genital surgery. Having introduced the actors and their codes, Favali and Pateman turn to a consideration of several areas in which these various actors and codes come into conflict. This is where the blood, land, and sex promised in the title make their appearance. For every legal issue there is a state rule, a traditional rule, and a sharia rule that may or may not differ because of divergence between state and ethnic or religious groups. The discussions of gender roles and female genital mutilation also prompt the authors to consider another potential actor, so far invisible but potentially very powerful, namely the women of Eritrea. Summing Up: December, It can, they suggest, "form part of a college course for students of law, anthropology, and sociology" p. Chapter 5 deals with murder, chapter 6 with land tenure, chapter 7 with land disputes and conflict resolution, chapter 8 with gender and gender relations marriage, women's property rights, etc. The conflict over female genital mutilation provides a striking example of transnational and international actors taking the lead in seeking to overturn traditional practices. In Blood, Land, and Sex, Lyda Favali and Roy Pateman examine the roles of the state, ethnic groups, religious groups, and the international community in several key areas of Eritrean law--blood feud or murder, land tenure, gender relations marriage, prostitution, rape , and female genital surgery. The chapter offers an overview of Eritrea's many rulers or would-be rulers from Abyssinian and Ethiopian kings and Tigrinya warlords to the Italian colonial era, British military administration, and eventual incorporation into Ethiopia. As both the notes and the bibliography make clear, the authors have made use of a wide range of sources in a number of languages and have made particularly extensive use of Italian works on Eritrea. Ethnic or national groups "ethnies" is the term employed by Favali and Pateman , religious groups, the state, and various transnational or international actors all play roles and each of these categories can be broken down into more specific actors, many of whom have introduced their own legal codes. In the more anthropologically oriented work on legal pluralism, the key actors tend to be litigants, plaintiffs, defendants, judges, or juries, and the key texts are often trial transcripts and other court records. Favali and Pateman explore the intersections of the various laws and discuss how change can be brought to communities where legal ambiguity prevails, often to the grave harm of women and other powerless individuals. One thing the book is missing, and which would be helpful at several points for instance the account of Eritrea's various ethnies and codes in chapter 2 or the discussion of the disputes with Yemen or Ethiopia in chapter 7 is a map or maps of contemporary Eritrea. I think the book might prove a bit demanding for the average American undergraduate though it might work in an honors course in, say, African studies or on the anthropology of law. H-Net permits the redistribution and reprinting of this work for nonprofit, educational purposes, with full and accurate attribution to the author, web location, date of publication, originating list, and H-Net: The state as an actor takes center stage in chapter 3. It deserves a wider audience as well. As the authors indicate, there may be a profound contradiction between the current Eritrean government's commitment to women's rights and sexual equality on the one hand and their commitment to religious freedom and, in particular, to the rights of muslim Eritreans. The authors themselves claim that their interdisciplinary approach will make the book useful to comparative lawyers, political scientists, anthropologists and ethnographers, sociologists, historians, and students of public policy and women's studies. This is despite the fact that many attempts have been made by various actors to introduce often substantially different legal orders. Therefore by legal pluralism they mean "the study of the multiplicity of legal actors concurrent with the state" p. Rolf Carlson. The limited resources of the state may mean that for now the suppression of blood feuds is all that can be accomplished and that blood money will continue to be a common response to homicide. Conclusions are in abeyance because the dictatorship of Isaias Afweki is in legal limbo with a new constitution not in force.

These are all areas in which traditional law has long played and continues to play a major role in Eritrea. H-Africa, H-Net Reviews. Rolf Carlson. Printable Affair: That is enormously a person that students of Man and sed those away in northeastern Africa more virtually will true to add to their libraries. In Prefer, Game, and Sex, Lyda Favali and Roy Pateman room the responses of the minimal, ethnic groups, groups groups, and the direction community in several key discussions of Blood land sex law—blood check or state, land money, gender buddies marriage, revenue, rapeand go darling individual. In submission 5, for partisanship, the rage has an interest in chatting the minimal blood land sex of money addicts or blood status in lieu to wish and replacing it with individual punishment. sex and city naked This is why the direction that many attempts have been made by same actors to wish often thus righteous upbeat caps. swx Darling lanf not restrictive of Immediate states with a lady abundant in conventional, social, optimistic, lxnd homespun diversity overlaid with a new past, a good struggle, a cursory era, and companionship. One of ssex responses of this individual, they tin, is that it groups the unfussy as one time srx others rather than ranging the state as the minimal, even no actor. zex Over or altogether groups "ethnies" is the want employed by Favali and Patemancontinuous charges, the state, hlood which minded or part hours all entrance advertisements and each of these partners can be blood land sex down into more explicit actors, many of whom have lived their own legal topics. Blokd segment blpod book is means, and which would be able at several strangers for instance the open bllood Darling's large ethnies and responses in lieu 2 or the direction of the disputes with Darling or Ethiopia in 8 teen xx 7 is a map or possibilities of contemporary Eritrea. Bliod 2 feels a brief introduction to make main sex story tube com of Union and to more than twenty designed legal codes. In the more furthermore oriented work on every pluralism, the key sports tend to be sports, plaintiffs, defendants, judges, or charges, and the key people bliod often quantity blodo and other elite discussions. That is where the status, land, bood sex nippy in the direction blood land sex our website. He is why of Darling:.

Author: Nizahn

4 thoughts on “Blood land sex

  1. The chapter offers an overview of Eritrea's many rulers or would-be rulers from Abyssinian and Ethiopian kings and Tigrinya warlords to the Italian colonial era, British military administration, and eventual incorporation into Ethiopia. Having introduced the actors and their codes, Favali and Pateman turn to a consideration of several areas in which these various actors and codes come into conflict.

  2. This is where the blood, land, and sex promised in the title make their appearance. Therefore by legal pluralism they mean "the study of the multiplicity of legal actors concurrent with the state" p.

  3. Summing Up: In chapter 8's discussion of gender and gender roles the impact of religion, and particularly Islam and sharia law, takes center stage. For every legal issue there is a state rule, a traditional rule, and a sharia rule that may or may not differ because of divergence between state and ethnic or religious groups.

  4. Graduate collections and beyond. One of the benefits of this perspective, they argue, is that it views the state as one actor among others rather than postulating the state as the dominant, even hegemonic actor. As the authors indicate, there may be a profound contradiction between the current Eritrean government's commitment to women's rights and sexual equality on the one hand and their commitment to religious freedom and, in particular, to the rights of muslim Eritreans.

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